Day 310 Peach Pudding

Today was a typical early November day so I feel like having a bit of summer. I’m making Peach Pudding from a recipe Mrs. Wm. Witt contributed to the 1906 Berlin Cook Book. It is a good recipe for this time of year since it uses canned fruit instead of fresh.

The main ingredient — a jar of peaches in juice

I beat the three medium eggs and then added the rest of the ingredients. I wasn’t sure whether the peaches should be in small pieces or if the slices I had were okay. I decided to chop most smaller but keep the rest in slices. Next I debated whether to add the juice or not. Based on the mention of “jar of peaches with juice” I decided to add the juice. It made a very thin batter. I greased a baking dish and poured in the batter. I baked the pudding for 1 hour at 350 degrees F. I really wondered how it was going to look and taste.

Mary Forler became Mrs. Wm Witt when she married William Witt. They had one child. She was born in Phillipsburg a small community in the area while he was from a neighbouring county. Based on the 1911 census the couple were very busy. William is listed as a hotel keeper so the household includes Mary, their son Clayton, a nephew and staff including a clerk, two bartenders, a porter, a bellboy, eight maids plus the guests. The hotel address is 1 King Street in Berlin so I imagine it is the Walper Hotel – a hotel still in existence.

Mrs. Wm Witt’s Peach Pudding

The pudding was pretty good in a plain sort of way. It was too eggy for me but it is not sweet so it’s a great dessert for anyone who doesn’t like sweet desserts or who must watch their intake of sugar. I sprinkled a little sugar on mine but a sweet sauce would do the same thing.

PEACH PUDDING
Mrs. Wm. Witt
Take 3 eggs, 1 cup milk, 1 cup flour, 1 teaspoon baking powder, 1 teaspoon vanilla, 1 jar peaches with juice, beat eggs well, then add milk, flour, baking powder and vanilla; peaches at last. Bake 1 hour. Serve hot with sauce or cold with cream.

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