Day 144 Welsh Rarebit

Today I discovered a bottle of beer left behind by my guest from Northern Ireland so naturally I decided to make another version of Welsh Rarebit from the 1906 Berlin Cook Book. This recipe was contributed by Mrs. Oscar Rumpel and contains quite a lot of beer.

I love cheese but really should not eat it so I made half the recipe. I melted 1/2 tablespoon of butter in a saucepan and then added 3/4 pound of grated medium cheddar cheese, 1/2 teaspoon and a small pinch of cayenne pepper. Just as the cheese was starting to melt I added 1 cup (1/2 pint) of beer and kept stirring until it was thoroughly blended. I toasted some bread, put it on a plate and then spooned some of the cheese mixture over top. Voila another Welsh Rarebit to taste.

Three women from the Rumpel family have recipes in the 1906 Berlin Cook Book. Mrs. George Rumpel, her daughter Hilda, and daughter in law Mrs. Oscar Rumpel contributed quite a variety of recipes. Ada H. R. Hilbourn married Oscar Rumpel in 1900. This young couple appear to live next door to Oscar’s parents George and Mina Rumpel and in 1906 they have two little boys. By the 1911 census they are living at 25 Cameron Street and have a 22 year old live in domestic named Bella Miller. Bella, like her employer Oscar are listed as having German heritage while Ada and the two boys are listed as English. Ada is Episcopalian, Bella is Methodist and the males are Lutheran. Oscar’s occupation is manufacturer in felt boot factory.

This version of Welsh Rarebit was slightly more liquid and more beer tasting than the other two. The cayenne wasn’t noticeable at all. This is a very quick dish and a modern cook could speed things along with pre-grated cheese.

WELSH RAREBIT
1 pound and a half of cheese, 1 tablespoon butter, 1 teaspoon dry mustard, a pinch of cayenne, 1/2 pint beer or ale and toast. Put butter into the pan when nearly melted add cheese grated, mustard, cayenne, stir constantly; add the ale slowly to prevent burning. Serve on toast.

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