Day 137 Cocoanut Puffs

Tonight is the last night for my taster from Northern Ireland. He returns home tomorrow so I thought these Cocoanut Puffs would be fun to try tasting. The recipe was submitted to the 1906 Berlin Cook Book by Mrs. Charles Delion.

There is a similar recipe on the page which helped me determine the preparation. I separated three medium eggs and whipped the whites as much as possible. Then I whipped in the sugar. I stirred in the vanilla and corn starch next. The mixture became a little more brown with the addition of the vanilla. Finally I stirred in the shredded cocoanut. I was short 1/2 a cup of cocoanut but I hoped it wouldn’t affect the recipe too much. I put parchment paper on two cookie sheets and I dropped spoonfuls of the mixture onto the greased parchment paper. I baked them for 10 minutes at 400 degrees F.

Mrs. Charles Delion seems to be unknown. I found a Charles Delion on the Waterloo Generations website who is a printer in Woolwich Township and Lutheran but no wife  is listed. I didn’t find him in the 1901 or 1911 census.

The cookies looked interesting as I pulled the pans from the oven. They were puffy and just golden brown. Unfortunately they quickly sank. I think making them smaller will help. I liked them even though they were flat rather than puffs. My taster found them too sweet and “light”. These are not manly cookies. I imagine the mysterious Mrs. Delion serving them to a small group of women for tea.

COCOANUT PUFFS
Whites of 3 eggs, 1 cup of white sugar, 1 tablespoon of vanilla, 2 tablespoons of cornstarch, 2 cups cocoanut.

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2 Responses to Day 137 Cocoanut Puffs

  1. Darryl Bonk says:

    Mrs. Charles Delion was Bertha E. Meier, daughter of Henry Meier and Catherine Hasenplug. b. 7 May 1863 in New Hamburg, buried in 1942 in St. Peter’s Lutheran Cemetery. married Charles C. Delion son of Dr. Fredrich William Delion and Anna Maria Magdalena Kuhn.

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